Feature: Hollywood Porn Industry In Decline!

The Internet Killed Hollywood Porn

For years the porn industry was dominated by an anarchic anything-goes attitude to sex. Directors competed to see who could stage the more outrageous stunts, pushing the performers to the limit of what their bodies could take.

The scenes could be hard to watch, as I discovered for myself when I visited sets for a book I was writing. The sex acts seemed to owe more to reality shows where people eat live worms and pig vomit than anything conventionally erotic.

But sometime around 2007, the “business of X” started going into a commercial tailspin. The arrival of free YouTube-style porn sites meant that consumers could download pirated scenes from the vast backlog of old content for free.

The phenomenon of DIY amateur sex – part-timers uploading their videos on sites such as clips4sale – also put a dent in the professionals’ pay cheques.

Suddenly an industry that was a byword for easy money, raking in billions by exploiting the anonymity of point-and-click purchasing, was fighting for its life.

Where the industry will end up is hard to predict. Clearly there is still a market for softcore movies made by companies such as Penthouse and Hustler, available on subscription channels.

The parodies may continue for a while, too. But it is difficult to see how a business selling hardcore movies and even internet clips is sustainable when most people simply don’t want to pay if they don’t have to. To many people, when it comes to porn, not paying for content seems the more moral thing to do.

Within ten years there could be no professional porn actor left.

It’s not easy to sympathise with the porn companies, which made so much money for so long by embracing a tawdry business and a dysfunctional work-pool.

But it is worth sparing a thought for the legions of performers, qualified for nothing much more than having sex on camera, who have no money saved, and no future.

And there is also the wider question. Don’t those who use porn owe it a little something? Shouldn’t those who download it be ready to pass on a little cash incentive to the business?

Does the stigma attached to porn make it OK to steal it? These questions underpin a much bigger dilemma being faced by all media.

How do you sustain an industry that provides a certain standard of product – be it journalism, music, or mainstream movies, or X-rated movies – when more and more consumers are in the habit of downloading content for free? In the world of porn it seems you can’t.

Google Glass seen as future of porn industry

The adult film industry will survive and thrive if it can evolve its X-rated content onto wearable devices such as Google Glass, as well as mobile phones and tablets, and if it can meet global demand for more ways to view pornography privately.

The adult film industry will survive and thrive if it can evolve its X-rated content onto wearable devices such as Google Glass, as well as mobile phones and tablets. It also needs to meet global demand for more ways to view pornography privately, digital media experts said Friday in Hollywood.

Mikandi.com, which bills itself as the world’s first and largest adult app store, created a promotional short that can be seen on Youtube.com. It features porn superstar James Deen showing how Google Glass can be used to shoot porn from a performer’s point of view.

Mikandi developed an app exclusively for Google Glass, but there are still legal obstacles to the technology, including Google’s policy against content that contains nudity, graphic sex acts or sexually explicit material viewed on its optical display.

In addition, the quality of the film and battery life remain challenging for filmmakers considering it. Many believe Google Glass or a version of it, will evolve with consumer demand.

As far as technology goes, that’s where the porn industry goes because everyone knows the porn industry were the pioneers.

But some are skeptical. XBIZ.net found that of those who responded to an online poll over a two-month period, 44 percent believe the 4K Ultra HD format won’t have an impact on the industry. Another 39 percent said it was too early to tell.

In another poll about Google Glass, 51 percent said they thought it was too early to tell if the optical head gear would have an impact, while 35 percent said it was just hype.

 

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